May/23/2011 District 5 Budget Advocacy for Seniors: A Conversation with Supervisor Mirkarimi and City Departments

Posted by Richard • May 23rd, 2011

Neighborhood Silver Tsunami 2011

Conversation with District 5 Supervisor Ross Mirkarimi & City Departments

Monday, May 23, 2011
10:30 AM to 12:00
Korean American Community Center
745 Buchanan Street at Grove

Let’s talk about issues important to seniors living in the community and how the current budget process may affect you.

Transportation

Food

Housing

Safety

May/4/2011 Press Release: Mayor Lee Announces Expanded Summer Programs for City’s Youth

Posted by Richard • May 4th, 2011

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:
Wednesday, May 4, 2011
Contact: Mayor’s Office of Communications, 415-554-6131

*** PRESS RELEASE ***

MAYOR LEE ANNOUNCES EXPANDED SUMMER PROGRAMS FOR CITY’S YOUTH
Partnerships with SFUSD, DCYF, Recreation and Park Department and Housing Authority to Keep Youth Engaged over the Summer Months

 

San Francisco, CA— Mayor Edwin M. Lee today announced that the City is expanding summer youth programs and opportunities through partnerships with the San Francisco Unified School District (SFUSD), Department of Children Youth and their Families (DCYF), Recreation and Park Department (RPD), and the San Francisco Housing Authority (SFHA) to keep youth engaged and learning over the 2011 summer months. The last day of public school is May 27, 2011.

“Offering meaningful and engaging learning opportunities for our City’s youth during the summer months is critical to supporting families in our communities,” said Mayor Lee. “In addition, the programming we are announcing today will help ensure that our young people will continue to receive the education they need to succeed in school and in their future.”

Mayor Lee helped secure $250,000 for summer school in San Francisco this year, covering the summer salaries of 30 SFUSD teachers and giving up to 900 ninth-grade students who failed English or algebra a second chance to prevent them from falling further behind and dropping out. A new SFUSD policy requires every student to pass all courses required for admission to a State university, starting with this year’s freshmen class. Due to budget cuts, SFUSD had only been able to offer summer programs for special education students and those in the juvenile justice system as well as classes for high school seniors who needed only a few more credits to graduate. DCYF, which funds summer programs across the City, identified unused funds at a time when school districts across the State have cut back or eliminated summer school to cover budget shortfalls.

Through special grants, SFUSD has stepped up summer school offerings, including the Superintendent’s Zone Summer Learning Academy with nine school sites integrating youth development and academic programs. Community partners for the Zone Summer Learning Academy include Aim High, Edgewood Children’s Services, Bay Area Community Resources, Jamestown Community Center, Mission Graduates, and First5 San Francisco. High school students will be able to earn credits, learn about college and have academic enrichment opportunities. Incoming kindergarteners will have a transition camp.

SFUSD is also partnering with City College of San Francisco to offer English classes to 250 new immigrants this summer.

“While I did once hear that ‘summer school’ was an oxymoron, the summer months are just as important for learning as the school year. Piecing together every possible resource, we have created a web of summer options for San Francisco’s children,” said SFUSD Superintendent Carlos Garcia. “I want to thank the Mayor, DCYF and Coleman Advocates for making sure that youth who are most at risk of dropping out are getting a chance to catch up.”

DCYF funds a variety of summer programs for children and youth of all ages citywide. In addition to year-round child care and family resource center programs, DCYF dedicates $3 million in funds for summer-specific programming for students in Kindergarten to Grade 8at 62 sites. These programs alone – which are designed to meet the needs of working families by providing full day programming and to help boost children’s learning through fun, engaging enrichment and recreation activities, will serve about 7,000 youth this summer at school and community sites. DCYF also funds 53 programs that provide teens with enrichment, leadership and youth employment opportunities.  Some of the largest youth employment programs DCYF funds for youth ages 14 to 21 include the Mayor’s Youth Employment and Education Program (MYEEP) (450 slots), YouthWorks (170 slots), Workreaction (120 slots). In addition to these services, all 63 violence prevention and intervention programs funded by DCYF will be operating this summer to provide prevention and intervention services to youth and young adults, perpetrators and victims of violence between the ages of 13 to 24 years old.  These services offer an array of summer planned activities to keep individuals engaged in positive lifestyles.  Community based organizations, such as the Community Response Networks, and city departments are also working diligently to finalize a summer plan to assure a safer San Francisco in Summer 2011.  Families, youth and the public can find out more about these services and more at San Francisco’s official family resource site at SFKids.org, which is funded by DCYF.

For the 14th Year, DCYF’s Summer Food program will be offering free lunches to youth across 80 sites between June 6 through August 5, 2011.  All approved sites are within walking distance of a school where 50 percent or more of the children enrolled qualify for free or reduced-price meals. An average of 5,000 meals will be served daily across various neighborhoods throughout the city.  Kid Chow is the newly selected food vendor, and offers a culturally diverse menu using 75 percent local suppliers, and serves primarily organic, hormone free, and free range food products. DCYF is also continuing its successful partnership with SF Food Bank to provide snacks to summer programs citywide. DCYF plans to outreach to the community about these efforts through the school district, city agencies, and community organizations, and families can find out site locations by calling 3-1-1 or 2-1-1, or at SFKids.org.

“Summer is a critical time for our children and youth and DCYF has worked hard to ensure that they have quality opportunities that foster their learning, health and growth,” said DCYF Director Maria Su. “DCYF provides millions of dollars in funding to community-based organizations across the city who offer a variety of summer program options, from summer camps to leadership programs for teen to youth jobs.”

RPD has stepped up and expanded its summer day camp programs, an addition increase of 15% over last summer, offering kids more than 67 different types of camp with over 15,000 camp slots available including 47 aftercare camps. RPD offers a variety of camps, from traditional outdoor camps to new offerings like science camp, aquatics camp and an urban adventures camp.  Art camps, tennis camps and even a cooking camp are also available. RPD also has a robust youth scholarship program to ensure that no child is turned away regardless of the ability, or inability, to pay. RPD and San Francisco Housing Authority will partner to offer housing residents reduced or no-cost camps.

This year’s camps include: Camp Mather which serves 1,150 families during the summer providing them a family camp experience; Camp Gourmet where campers will learn basic cooking skills from skilled and accomplished chefs, interpret recipes, develop meal planning skills, learn the true meaning of nutrition; Arts Camp-Dance Video and World Dance, an intensive art making  camp where kids can explore and develop their artistic abilities in art, dance, music, theater & technology lead by talented art specialists; and Digital Storytelling & Photo Exploration Camp where campers will be taught by certified instructors to develop digital story lines through photos and other multi-media options.

This summer RPD will be hosting and facilitating a 4 day 3 night overnight outdoor eco-experience camp for at-risk and in-risk youth at Camp Mather from August 25- 29. The importance of exposing our most vulnerable youth to outdoor environments and nature is a responsibility that should not be overlooked. Last year, RPD sent staff and at-risk/in-risk youth to the State Parks Outdoor Youth Connection program in an effort to teach local youth how to lead outdoor trips and projects. Training youth from under-served socio economically challenged urban areas will teach them to be outdoor leaders and lead to employment in outdoor programs and services.

“Our camps are traditionally some of the most popular programs in the City,” said Recreation and Park Department General Manager Phil Ginsburg. “We are so proud of the quality, variety, and innovation of our camps, and this year we are excited to offer San Francisco families an excellent alternative to summer school.”

For more RPD information, call 415-831-2700 or 3-1-1 or go to sfrecpark.org.

###

May/4/2011 SF Examiner: San Francisco Schools Bracing for Ever-Deeper Budget Cuts

Posted by Richard • May 4th, 2011

San Francisco schools bracing for ever-deeper budget cuts
Article dated: Wed, 20 Apr 2011 11:00:43 +0000

San Francisco schools

A budget gap of nearly $109 million over the next two years is predicted for San Francisco schools, which could mean deeper cuts to programs, larger class sizes and even school closures under the worst-case scenario.

The grim budget forecast was outlined Tuesday night to the Board of Education.

“What we have ahead of us is totally unacceptable,” Superintendent Carlos Garcia told board members at the start of the meeting. “This is one of the worst scenarios I’ve ever seen.”

The San Francisco Unified School District, which operates on a budget of $490 million, must cut $24.8 million for the 2011-12 school year. These cuts are based on Gov. Jerry Brown’s failure to convince legislators in Sacramento to hold a June special election that would have let voters decide to extend vehicle and income taxes.

Without the tax extensions, roughly $2 billion must be cut from K-12 schools across California. The state is facing a $19 billion budget shortfall.

The deficit in San Francisco schools could grow to another $84 million by the 2012-13 school year if the state’s economy doesn’t turn around.

Next year’s budget could be worse, said Myong Leigh, deputy superintendent of policy and operations, depending on the governor’s revised budget, which is due in May. Discussions in Sacramento have focused on an “all-cuts” budget that would slice current spending to extremely low levels without raising any revenues, K-12 schools would stand to lose another $4 billion.

If additional cuts need to be made schools could be closed, the school year could be shorter, class sizes could be increased and cuts could be made to advanced-placement programs, among other areas, Leigh said. The district must approve a budget and submit it to Sacramento by July 1. Two community meetings are scheduled for May and the Board of Education will vote on a final budget by June 28.

akoskey@sfexaminer.com

Apr/28/2011 District 5 Budget Town Hall

Posted by Richard • April 28th, 2011

With the City again facing a $380 million deficit, Supervisor Mirkarimi will host a Budget Town Hall with Mayor Lee and other city department heads on:

Thursday, April 28th
6:30 pm
All-Purpose Room at the Hamilton Recreation Center
1900 Geary Boulevard

Please join Supervisor Mirkarimi and Mayor Lee at the Budget Town Hall. Parking in the neighborhood is limited, so please take Muni–lines 22 or 38 are both convenient to the rec center.

Apr/5/2011 Citizen’s Committee on Community Development Meeting [CDBG Funds]

Posted by Richard • April 5th, 2011

Citizen’s Committee on Community Development Meeting
April 5, 2011
5:00 to 7:00 pm
Mayor’s Office of Housing
1 South Van Ness Avenue, 5th Floor, SF

For more information, please call 415-701-5500.

 

SF Examiner: $7M in federal funding cuts to hit jobs, housing, child programs in San Francisco [CDBG Funds]

Article dated: Wed, 30 Mar 2011 11:00:04 +0000

U.S. Labor Secretary Hilda Solis

San Francisco officials are bracing for about $7 million in cuts to federal funding for anti-poverty and community-development programs.

While the exact cuts have yet to be determined, officials estimate that Community Development Block Grants will decrease from $22.2 million to about $15 million for San Francisco alone.

That means less money for services such as job training, small-business assistance, and housing for homeless and foster children. It comes as The City faces its own estimated deficit of $380 million.

The U.S. House of Representatives has proposed a 62.5 percent cut while President Barack Obama has only proposed 7.5 percent, according to Doug Shoemaker of the Mayor’s Office of Housing. The worst-case scenario would affect more than 13,000 low-income and needy families, seniors and youth, and more than 620 small businesses, he said.

Mayor Ed Lee and supervisors Carmen Chu and John Avalos introduced a resolution last week that calls on Obama to minimize the cuts. While Obama has pledged to maintain the funding amid concerns from other big-city mayors, congressional Republicans are working to reduce the national deficit.

Community Development Block Grants represent about $4 billion in federal dollars given to local governments to use on a variety of programs that fight poverty and homelessness. In San Francisco, much of that money is given to nonprofit organizations while about $10 million goes to the Mayor’s Office of Housing for affordable housing, loans and other programs.

The public will have a chance to weigh in when the Citizen’s Committee on Community Development meets at 1 South Van Ness Ave. on April 5. Committee member Joshua Arce said the cuts will affect all organizations that rely on the funding.

“There’s a consensus that we must prioritize safety-net services for our most vulnerable residents,” Arce said. “I think every organization that we fund is going to see less money than they saw last year.”

bbegin@sfexaminer.com

Going backward

Estimated impact of federal budget cuts:

$22.2 million
CDBG funds The City received in 2010
$15.5 million Estimated 2011 funds
13,000 Estimated city residents to be affected by projected cuts
620 Estimated businesses to be affected

 

Mar/30/2011 SF Examiner: $7M in federal funding cuts to hit jobs, housing, child programs in San Francisco [CDBG Funds]

Posted by Richard • March 30th, 2011

SF Examiner: $7M in federal funding cuts to hit jobs, housing, child programs in San Francisco [CDBG Funds]
Article dated: Wed, 30 Mar 2011 11:00:04 +0000

U.S. Labor Secretary Hilda Solis

San Francisco officials are bracing for about $7 million in cuts to federal funding for anti-poverty and community-development programs.

While the exact cuts have yet to be determined, officials estimate that Community Development Block Grants will decrease from $22.2 million to about $15 million for San Francisco alone.

That means less money for services such as job training, small-business assistance, and housing for homeless and foster children. It comes as The City faces its own estimated deficit of $380 million.

The U.S. House of Representatives has proposed a 62.5 percent cut while President Barack Obama has only proposed 7.5 percent, according to Doug Shoemaker of the Mayor’s Office of Housing. The worst-case scenario would affect more than 13,000 low-income and needy families, seniors and youth, and more than 620 small businesses, he said.

Mayor Ed Lee and supervisors Carmen Chu and John Avalos introduced a resolution last week that calls on Obama to minimize the cuts. While Obama has pledged to maintain the funding amid concerns from other big-city mayors, congressional Republicans are working to reduce the national deficit.

Community Development Block Grants represent about $4 billion in federal dollars given to local governments to use on a variety of programs that fight poverty and homelessness. In San Francisco, much of that money is given to nonprofit organizations while about $10 million goes to the Mayor’s Office of Housing for affordable housing, loans and other programs.

The public will have a chance to weigh in when the Citizen’s Committee on Community Development meets at 1 South Van Ness Ave. on April 5. Committee member Joshua Arce said the cuts will affect all organizations that rely on the funding.

“There’s a consensus that we must prioritize safety-net services for our most vulnerable residents,” Arce said. “I think every organization that we fund is going to see less money than they saw last year.”

bbegin@sfexaminer.com

Going backward

Estimated impact of federal budget cuts:

$22.2 million
CDBG funds The City received in 2010
$15.5 million Estimated 2011 funds
13,000 Estimated city residents to be affected by projected cuts
620 Estimated businesses to be affected

 

Nov/22/2010 New SF Foundation Grantmaking Program Launches to Strengthen Impact

Posted by Richard • November 22nd, 2010

Announcement from SF Foundation:

Dear Friend,

The San Francisco Foundation, as a community foundation, continually engages in listening and responding to community. This past year we did an intensive analysis and recalibration of our focus and processes. We seized this opportunity to respond to the dramatic shifts in our community due to the economic downturn, and to adapt ourselves to the myriad changes all around us; shrinking government resources, a streamlining nonprofit sector, and emerging trends in philanthropy, nationally and locally.

The theme we heard loud and clear throughout our listening campaign, and the theme that drives our new plan is that of impact. By narrowing our focus and deepening our investments, we aim to strengthen our impact in achieving social justice throughout all of our work; grantmaking, public policy, leadership development, sustainability in the nonprofit sector, and vitality in neighborhoods and communities. We are honored and humbled by the generous contributions of our family of donors, past and present, and we are committed to delivering impact with the investments they have entrusted to us.

Thank you for your input, insights, and advice in shaping the plan. Community input has been essential in informing and guiding our strategic plan over the past several months. We appreciate the diverse perspectives we received from our donors, grantees, funding partners, civic leaders, and key groups and individuals from the government and private sectors.

Thank you for your steadfast support and all that you do to help make the Bay Area a better place for us all.

Sincerely,

Sandra R. Hernández, M.D.
Chief Executive Officer

2010 Grantmaking

As we launch our 2010 Grantmaking Cycle, we are eager to share with you our priorities and strategies. These areas of focus are both for the near term in response to the economic downturn, and for the longer term to enhance our impact in community.

As a community foundation with social justice at our core, striving for the greater good is our driving force. As we adapt and respond to shifting community needs, we continue to build on our core Program strengths – expertise and leadership in Arts and Culture, Community Development, Community Health, Education, and the Environment. This grantmaking will be an Open Application Cycle beginning November 1, 2010.

In response to the economic downturn, and its collateral effects, we will provide focused funding by invitation only that targets safety net partners, jobs training and creation, and foreclosure response and neighborhood preservation for the next three years. Our strategy maximizes our collaborations with other funders, extraordinary nonprofit organizations, government, and the business sector to leverage the most impact. This invitation-only funding cycle launched Monday, October 11, 2010.

There are two Funds that will open in 2011, that are separate from our annual Open Application Cycle. Our Transitions Fund will support nonprofit organizations seeking support for mergers and acquisitions, shared-services, and other organizational transitions. The Immigration Integration Fund will promote the integration of immigrants into the civic and economic life of our region. More information will be available on www.sff.org in early 2011.

To increase our internal coordination and effectiveness, and thus our community impact, we hold an organizing principle based on our belief that meaningful change happens through people, organizations, neighborhoods, policy, advocacy, and organizing. This organizing principle serves as a backdrop for us as we vet, analyze, and coordinate our grantmaking for the greatest impact possible. To read more about these principles, click here.

Stay Connected

We encourage you to visit www.sff.org for complete information about our goals and objectives, as well as details about how to apply. You can also read Frequently Asked Questions here.

If you would like to be kept updated by email, please click here to provide your contact information.